Columna vertebral in english

Spine anatomy

Representative drawing of the segments of the spine, left lateral view: cervical region (red); thoracic region (blue); lumbar region (yellow); sacro-axial region (green); coccyx (violet). Th#: dorsal vertebra. Os Sacrum: sacral bone. Coccyx: coccyx.Name and classificationLatin
The vertebral column, spine or the rachis is a complex articulated and resistant cartilaginous or bony structure, in the form of a longitudinal stem, which constitutes the posterior of the axial skeleton of vertebrate animals that protects the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is the spinal cord of the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a complex cartilaginous or bony structure.
In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a set of bones located (at its greatest extent) in the middle and posterior part of the trunk, and runs from the head (which it supports), through the neck and back, to the pelvis to which it gives support.[2] The vertebral column consists of two regions.
The vertebral column consists of two main regions in fish, trunk and caudal. In tetrapods, the cervical region related to the neck and the sacral region, related to the pelvic girdle, are added. In mammals, the truncal region is divided into thoracic and lumbar. [1]

What is the vertebral column

Representative drawing of the segments of the spine, left lateral view: cervical region (red); thoracic region (blue); lumbar region (yellow); sacro-axial region (green); coccyx (violet). Th#: dorsal vertebra. Os Sacrum: sacral bone. Coccyx: coccyx.Name and classificationLatin
The vertebral column, spine or the rachis is a complex articulated and resistant cartilaginous or bony structure, in the form of a longitudinal stem, which constitutes the posterior of the axial skeleton of vertebrate animals that protects the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is the spinal cord of the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a complex cartilaginous or bony structure.
In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a set of bones located (at its greatest extent) in the middle and posterior part of the trunk, and runs from the head (which it supports), through the neck and back, to the pelvis to which it gives support.[2] The vertebral column consists of two regions.
The vertebral column consists of two main regions in fish, trunk and caudal. In tetrapods, the cervical region related to the neck and the sacral region, related to the pelvic girdle, are added. In mammals, the truncal region is divided into thoracic and lumbar. [1]

Columna vertebral en español

Representative drawing of the segments of the spine, left lateral view: cervical region (red); thoracic region (blue); lumbar region (yellow); sacro-axial region (green); coccyx (violet). Th#: dorsal vertebra. Os Sacrum: sacral bone. Coccyx: coccyx.Name and classificationLatin
The vertebral column, spine or the rachis is a complex articulated and resistant cartilaginous or bony structure, in the form of a longitudinal stem, which constitutes the posterior of the axial skeleton of vertebrate animals that protects the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is the spinal cord of the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a complex cartilaginous or bony structure.
In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a set of bones located (at its greatest extent) in the middle and posterior part of the trunk, and runs from the head (which it supports), through the neck and back, to the pelvis to which it gives support.[2] The vertebral column consists of two regions.
The vertebral column consists of two main regions in fish, trunk and caudal. In tetrapods, the cervical region related to the neck and the sacral region, related to the pelvic girdle, are added. In mammals, the truncal region is divided into thoracic and lumbar. [1]

Lumbar spine

Representative drawing of the segments of the spine, left lateral view: cervical region (red); thoracic region (blue); lumbar region (yellow); sacro-axial region (green); coccyx (violet). Th#: dorsal vertebra. Os Sacrum: sacral bone. Coccyx: coccyx.Name and classificationLatin
The vertebral column, spine or the rachis is a complex articulated and resistant cartilaginous or bony structure, in the form of a longitudinal stem, which constitutes the posterior of the axial skeleton of vertebrate animals that protects the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is the spinal cord of the spinal cord.[1] In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a complex cartilaginous or bony structure.
In humans and other hominoids, the vertebral column is a set of bones located (at its greatest extent) in the middle and posterior part of the trunk, and runs from the head (which it supports), through the neck and back, to the pelvis to which it gives support.[2] The vertebral column consists of two regions.
The vertebral column consists of two main regions in fish, trunk and caudal. In tetrapods, the cervical region related to the neck and the sacral region, related to the pelvic girdle, are added. In mammals, the truncal region is divided into thoracic and lumbar. [1]

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